megan dash picIf I had a dime for every time a parent rationalized their child’s difficulty in math with their own, “but-I-was-always-bad-at-math” story, I’d be able to retire already! Some students find learning math to be difficult because of its concrete nature and building block structure.  Others find it comforting for the same reasons. Overall, children of all ages, grade levels, and genders report hating math. Inside of the classroom, not only do we fight the “I-hate-math” attitude, we continue to fight gender stereotypes about the subject–boys are good at math and girls are not.

Larry Martinek, founder of Mathnasium, wrote, “Children don’t hate math. What they hate is being confused, intimidated, and embarrassed by math. With understanding comes passion, and with passion comes growth – a treasure is unlocked.” (Mathnasium LLC, 2018)

So, how can we change your child’s attitude about math, their “MATH-itude”? Here are 5 easy steps you can take right away:

Eliminate math from the naughty words list.  When talking about math, you don’t have to be overly excited, but it shouldn’t be a curse word in your home. Make your problem-solving and mathematical thinking visible to your child.  Explain your thinking, your challenges, and your solutions. Understanding the process may make the solution seem less intimidating.

Ask for their mathematical assistance.  Students retain math skills best when learned in context. Ask your child to help you solve a real-life math problem to solidify mathematical problem solving and creative thinking skills. For example, how many gallons of paint do you think we will need to cover all four walls in two bedrooms? Why do you think the speed limit decreases when we are going downhill? What is the most efficient way to rearrange the furniture in your bedroom to allow for the most open play space?

Share your love of learning.  When you are excited about learning–not just math–your children notice it.  They seek engagement and modeling. Take mathematical risks and share them with your children.  Invest money, deposit the coins you’ve been saving, try a new recipe but convert some of the measurements as a fun challenge!

Praise them. It’s okay to acknowledge good grades, but we don’t praise grades, we praise people! Ask about and discuss your child’s EFFORT, not their grades. Success isn’t always about the end result, rather the process, which leads to a richer learning experience. When children share their thinking and hear adults praise them, they begin to believe what they are saying is true.

Measure your math-itude.  What kind of message are you sending your child? Identify what is making you confused, intimidated, or embarrassed and acknowledge it out loud. Then actively and openly look for a solution. Be an example of perseverance and embracing the process.

And remember, “If you don’t like something change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.” Maya Angelou

 ~Megan Dash, Special Educator, City Neighbors Charter School~